Early Grand Rapids News – Morning Telegram 1884-1886

The short-lived Grand Rapids Morning Telegram was founded 30 September 1884 as a Republican Daily (liberal).  No Sundays.  The paper was sold April 1886 and merged with Brezee’s Grand Rapids Herald to form the Telegram-Herald.  It was one of the first papers to publish limited births, marriages and deaths in addition to divorces and a gossip column interesting to family historians.

This is a work in progress.  I will be adding to the list as time allows.  I am a rather busy fellow.

 

25 November 1884
DIED.
OLIVER – Nov. 22, of consumption, Sophia C. Oliver, aged 58 years, 1 month, 27 days.  Funeral Tuesday 10 a.m., from residence 395 Front street.

27 November 1884
James Strong, son-in-law of Benj. F. Sliter, who arrived here a week ago from Texas, died yesterday morning at 4 o’clock.  His father in Kentucky has been telegraphed for.  Mr. Strong leaves considerable means, including a life insurance policy of $10,000.

29 November 1884
Mrs. Caroline Patten died early yesterday morning at the residence of her son, Lyman Patten, 358 Fulton street.  She was aged 79 years.  The funeral will be to-morrow afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.

29 November 1884
Ankje Koplers, No. 11 Kent alley, diphtheria, and Freddie Plune, No. 46 Sinclair street, scarlet fever, were on the report of the Board of Health yesterday.

29 November 1884
Killed by a Falling Tree.
A laborer named Sebolt, employed by a farmer named Tubbs, residing six miles east of this city, was killed Thanksgiving afternoon by a tree falling on him, crushing his skull and breaking his legs, arms and back. His d[e]ath was caused by the tree suddenly splitting while he was sawing  it, and one of the parts falling on him while attempting to escape.  He is unmarried and is supposed to have formerly lived at Lowell.  Coroner Bradish was notified, but he decided an inquest unnecessary.  If not claimed by friends the funeral will be held from Dolbee & McCollum’s undertaking rooms, where the remains now lie.

29 November 1884
MARRIED
SPROAT – LANE – In this city Nov. 27, 1884, by the Rev. Dr. Samuel Graves, at the residence of the above presiding clergyman on Bansom street, Mr. J. Clark Sproat to Miss Jessie E. Lane, both of this city.

2 December 1884
The remains of William Seaboldt, the man who was killed on Thanksgiving day, were buried yesterday in Potter’s Field in the Fulton Street cemetery.

3 December 1884
The funeral of Henry Prindle will be held this afternoon from No. 153 Front street.  The friends of the family and the deceased are invited to attend.

3 December 1884
Louis C. Becker and Miss Estella Greenway were married last evening by the Rev. Mr. Frinke.  Mr. Becker is shipping clerk in the wholesale house of Rindge, Bertsch & Co.

3 December 1884
Henry E. Prindle, of the firm of Prindle Brothers, the West Side druggists, died yesterday morning of neuralgia of the heart.  He was an active business man, and well liked by a host of friends who will mourn his early departure from life.

4 December 1884
The funeral of the late Henry Prindle will take place from the family residence, 153 Front street, this afternoon.

4 December 1884
Born – To Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Arthur, a boy; weight, ten pounds.

5 December 1884
The funeral of the late Henry Prindle, held yesterday, was largely attended.  The city druggists attended in a body.

5 December 1884
Born – To Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Cole; a son.

10 December 1884
MARRIED.
MURPHY-RHODES. – In Muskegon, at the Congregational parsonage, by Rev. M. W. Fairfield, Dec. 8, 1884, Mr. A. H. Murphy to Miss Jennie V. Rhodes, both of Muskegon.

12 December 1884
Maggie Skinner has filed a bill in the Circuit Court praying for a divorce from her husband, Charles Skinner.  The parties were married in this city in September 1874, and lived together until last July.

13 December 1884
Rev. S. S. Graves, D. D., performed two marriage services at his residence Wednesday evening.  One was the wedding of Amos Shutz and Miss Etta Clark, both of Grandville; and Jay H. Holton and Miss Carrie A. Dean, both of this city.

16 December 1884
A Janitor Drops Dead While at His Daily Task.
For a little over a year Kemp Schuidema who resides in a cottage at the rear of 116 Center street, has been the janitor of the Granville avenue school home.  He has performed his daily tasks in the school building regularly and well, and has generally returned home at night from his work a little after 5 o’clock.  Last evening he failed to return home and two of his children went to the school-house about 6 o’clock to ascertain the cause of his delay.  They found the doors unlocked but did not enter the building and instead reported the absence of their father at police headquarters.  Immediately Sergeant Johnson and Officer Scobey started for the school-house.  Whey they arrived they searched all the room but found on one.  They then went to the basement, where they found Mr. Schuidema dead, near the coal heap.  The coal shuttle was about one-half full of coal, the shovel lay as it fell from the man’s hands, and the unfortunate lay upon his back as though he had fallen over and expired instantly, which is probably the case.  He complained at noon, while at dinner, of a pain in his chest, and it is thought he died of heart disease.  The officers conveyed the deceased to his home and immediately summoned Coroner Bradish, who will hold an inquest this morning.  Mr. Schuidema was fifty-six years of age, had lived in this city about nine years, and leaves a family, consisting of a wife and five children, the youngest child being nine years old.

17 December 1884
Justice Westfall on Monday married Frank W. Lowell to Bessie Cain, both of this city, and Andrew Wharfield of South Haven, to Julia O. Hendershot, of this city.

18 December 1884
The Marriage of Mr. J. J. Sours and Miss Wykes.
The frosty air, the joyful spirit incident to the anticipations of the ensuing week, and the sleigh bells and the marriage bell intermingled in making the home of A. B. Wykes, Esq., 165 Lafayette street, the scene of one of the happiest events in the city last evening, the occasion being the marriage of Miss Mamie Wykes and Mr. J. J. Sours.  The house was profusely ornamented with appropriate decorations.  In the library was stationed an orchestra which lent additional charm to the ceremony and reception by discoursing several selections which, in sentiment, seemed to have been selected with especial reference to what was transpiring in the adjoining rooms.  Miss Maggie Strahan, of this city, and Miss Mae E. Turner of Jackson, were the bridesmaids, and Messrs. Fred Leonard and Arthur Dennison the groomsmen.  Upon the conclusion of the ceremony, which was performed by Rev. Dr. Graves, a reception and an elegant collation by Kuhn, the caterer, followed next in order.  The presents were numerous and elegant, comprising silverware, china sets, etc.  There was a large assemblage of friends of the contracting parties present, all of whom were happy in their congratulations and good wishes.  Mr. and Mrs. Sours will be “at home” at 88 Coit avenue after the 25th inst.

19 December 1884
Nellie Reber wants a bill of divorce from her husband, Howard L. Reber, on the grounds of adultery.  Her complaint was filed in the Superior Court yesterday.

19 December 1884
Sheriff Kinney and several of his deputies will attend the funeral of Deputy Sheriff Fred Snyder to-day, at Lowell.  Mr. Snyder died on Wednesday after a brief illness.  He was about 36 years old and leaves a wife and three children.

22 December 1884
The death of Miss Emma, daughter of Mr. Alexander Hamilton, has cast a gloom over the immediate friends and relatives of the deceased lady.  Her youth and versatile accomplishments make the pangs of her untimely death all the more difficult to bear by her friends.

24 December 1884
Mrs. Bridget Kearney, the mother of Patrolman Kearney, died in Saginaw yesterday.  Notice of her funeral in this city will be published later.

24 December 1884
Harry Arkema, formerly of this city, died in Detroit Monday.  His funeral will be held in this city on Friday, at 2 p.m., from his mother’s residence, corner of Cass and Morrison streets.

24 December 1884
DIED.
PIERSON. – Mrs. Elmira Pierson, Dec. 22, aged 66 years.  Funeral at the residence of Dr. C. W. Prindle, 96 Fourth street, Wednesday at 2 o’clock.  Friends of family invited.

25 December 1884
Friends of Samuel Davison, who died at the Sherman House on Sunday, sent his remains to relatives in Canada yesterday.

25 December 1884
The funeral of the mother of Patrolman Kearney occurs to-morrow morning from St. Andrew’s church.

25 December 1884
Harry Arkema, better known by his mother’s surname, of Van Etten, will be buried to-morrow at 2 p.m. from her residence, corner of Cass and Morrison streets.

30 December 1884
The funeral of the late Isaac A. DeLamarfro took place at the family residence at 260 Sixth street, on Sunday afternoon.  The solemn and impressive services were under the auspices of the Masonic order and conducted by the Rev. E. H. Brooks and Rev. H. P. Welton.

30 December 1884
John S. Nichols was granted a decree of divorce yesterday from his wife by the Circuit Court on the ground of desertion.

1 January 1885
Cards are out announcing the marriage of Miss May, daughter of Harvey J. Hollister, Esq., and Mr. McGeorge Bundy.  The ceremony will be performed at Mr. Hollister’s residence, January 8.

3 January, 1885
Justice Brouwer married Albert Van Ommen yesterday to Fannie Buttman, both of Fremont Center.

3 January 1885
MARRIAGES
BONSOE-LAWRSON – On Dec. 30, 1884, by the Rev. Dr. Graves, Charles A. Bonsoe, of this city, to Miss Mary Lawrson, of Hudsonville.
CLUFF-BENTLEY – On Dec. 31, 1884, by the same, Harvey Cluff to Mrs. Mercy Bentley, both of this city.
WIEGMINK-LANNING – On the same day, by the same, John H. Wiegmink, of Allegan, to Miss Jennie Lanning, of this city.

6 January 1885
The funeral of the late Mrs. Geo. Thompson will take place this morning at 9:30 from St. Andrews Church, corner of Sheldon and Oakes street.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

6 January 1885
Killed by a Fall.
In Saturday morning’s TELEGRAM appeared an item with reference to a man’s falling from the steps of the Alaska Hotel, in Alaska township, early Friday morning and receiving severe injuries.  The man was Frank Le Clear, a bachelor, who had been attending a New Year’s ball at the above place.  He was under the influence of liquor when he fell from the steps, striking upon his head and fracturing the parietal bone.  He lived about twenty-four hours after the accident.

7 January 1885
Married, by the Rev. Chas. Fluhrer, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Dr. and Mrs. L. A. Rogers, 13 Waverly Place, yesterday morning, Miss Nellie Frances Rogers and Chas. N. McWhorter.

9 January 1885
DIED.
GATES – Mrs. Louisa E. Gates, wife of Dr. L. L. Gates, at 3 o’clock Thursday morning, after a short illness, aged 40 years, 11 months, and 7 days.  The funeral will take place at the residence, 105 Monroe street, at 2 p.m. to-day.  All friends are invited to attend.

11 January 1885
Geo. R. Healey, a printer, has applied to the Superior Court for a divorce from his wife, Ida G. Healey.  He charges cruelty and desertion.

13 January 1885
Frank Hillebert, a well-to-do bachelor, with considerable means and a life insurance policy for $2,000, died in this city on Sunday last.  Action was taken yesterday in the Probate Court, for the appointment of a special administrator of his estate.  His will has not yet been opened.

14 January 1885
Gilbert-Phelps.
E. A. Gilbert, more familiarly known as “Ned,” of Duluth, son of Mr. F. B. Gilbert, or this city, will be married to-day to Miss Marie Phelps, of Detroit.  Among those who will be present at the ceremony from this city are Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Gilbert, Mr. and Mrs. Will D. Gilbert, Miss Kate Gilbert, Mr. and Mrs. Philo. C. Fuller, Mr. Anthony Hodenpyle, Oden Hughart, Will McCay and Mr. Cal. Holt.

16 January 1885
A Sad Accident.
An infant son of Michael Maher, who resides on Wallbridge street, near Canal, met with a fatal accident yesterday morning.  While its mother was preparing breakfast it crept to the trap door leading to the cellar and fell through, striking its head, and breaking its neck.  The child lived about an hour.  Coroner Bradish rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.

16 January 1885
The Elevator Accident.
The killing of the boy Kersyes by an elevator on Wednesday, calls general attention to the fact of the ungarded [sic] condition of a majority of private elevators in this city.  A gate with a wire netting at all landings would prevent the possibility of such an accident occurring.  The verdict of the coroner’s jury in Kersyes’ case was that his death was owing to his own negligence.  The fact was also ascertained that he was hard of hearing, a common weakness, and which adds to the argument for more safeguards about these death-traps.

17 January 1885
Relying on the report at Police Headquarters The Telegram of yesterday stated that a child of Michael Maher broke its neck by falling into the cellar.  The child fell into the cellar, but did not did from the injuries received, though its chances of living are very dubious, at least this was the report last night at headquarters.

17 January 1885
Death of Mrs. J. B. Rose.
The many acquaintances and friends of A. J. Rose will be pained this morning when they read of the death of his most estimable wife who died about midnight last night.  She was a woman highly respected and admired for her kind disposition and exemplary traits of womanhood.

17 January 1885
Mr. Samuel Gray, father of Ionis M. Gray, of this city, who recently died intestate at Indianapolis, had property valued at $500,000.  It will be divided among the widow, three sons and four daughters.

17 January 1885
DIED.
ROSE – Mrs. A. J. Rose, at her home 91 Mt. Vernon street, January 16, aged 44 years and 9 months.  Notice of funeral hereafter.

19 January 1885
The funeral of the late Mrs. A. J. Rose will be held at 11 o’clock this morning from the Second Street Methodist Church.

20 January 1885
Dennis Talbot, father-in-law of Thomas Sargeant, who resides at the corner of Cherry and Summit streets, fell backwards down a pair of stairs Sunday evening, sustaining injuries from which he died yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock.  Mr. Sargeant who was up north harvesting ice, was telegraphed for. The deceased was 87 years of age, a resident of Grattan, and was visiting his daughter at the time of the fatal accident.

23 January 1885
A man named Orra Peirce had the first finger of his right hand taken off by a buzz saw in Rademacher’s factory, yesterday morning. The accident was doubly unfortunate, as the man had but just commenced work after having been out of employment for some time.

23 January 1885
A very happy event took place last evening at five o’clock p.m.  Quite a company of friends gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Wheeler, Oak street, to witness the marriage of their daughter, Lucie, to Mr. Frederic C. Miller, one of Grand Rapids most promising business men.  The very impressive service was performed by Bishop Gillespie, godfather of Mr. Miller. Miss Wheeler has for several years been a teacher in our public schools.  The many valuable presents from friends and pupils betokens the esteem in which she was held.  After a bountiful supper was partaken of the happy couple, amid the good wishes of their friends, left on the evening train for Grand Rapids, where a new residence, beautifully furnished, is in waiting for them.  May they have many years of happiness in the same, is the hearty wish of numerous friends. – Kalamazoo Telegraph.

23 January 1885
JUDGE SINCLAIR DEAD.
The Fatal Result of An Attack of Paralysis on Wednesday.
Justice Thompson Sinclair died at his residence, No. 144, Lyon street, last evening at about 7 o’clock.  The deceased had not been in the enjoyment of robust health for nearly ten years, and during the past year had several attacks of sickness which nearly proved fatal.  The hopes of his family and many friends were such strengthened the past few weeks by the apparent improvement of health of Mr. Sinclair, and the announcement of his death was a sad surprise to all.  The first intimation of his serious illness was noticed yesterday morning when he attempted to dress himself after rising.  Dr. Johnson was summoned at once and pronounced the attack paralysis, the left side of the patient being badly affected.  Dr. Brady was called in at noon and assisted in ministering to the dying man until death claimed him in the midst of his sorrowing family.
Thompson Sinclair was the son of Irish parents, of the Episcopal faith, and was born at Romulus, Seneca county, New York, June 18, 1819.  He moved with his parents to this State in the spring of 1839, locating at Ann Arbor.  He engaged in mercantile business in that place with his brother Samuel (since dead) shortly after, and carried it on for a number of years, afterward engaging in the milling business at Vicksboro, a village four miles distant.  In October, 1843, he married Miss Eunice White, of Clinton, Lenawee county, who remained his partner through life.  In the spring of 1846, he moved with his family to Grand Rapids, and engaged in the dry goods business on Monroe street.  In 1856 Mr. Sinclair was elected justice of the peace, and in 1873 to the office of police judge, being the first to hold that responsible position in this city. Since his first election in 1856, to the time of his death, the deceased had filled, almost without cessation, a judicial position with marked ability and entire satisfaction to the community.
Of the seven children born to him, five are living: A. Porter Sinclair, Thompson W. Sinclair, Mrs. G. S. Johnson, residents of this city, and Frederick and David Sinclair, residing in San Francisco, California.  His next youngest brother, Robert P. Sinclair, Esq., also a prominent citizen, has been a resident of this city for many years, and was with the deceased at the time of his death. Justice Sinclair was distinguished through life as an amiable, kind hearted man, a good neighbor, fond husband, indulgent father, upright judge, and useful citizen. The community at large has lost one of its most honored, respected members, and his absence will long be felt among its older members.

24 January 1885
Dr. Perry Schurtz is the father of a ten-pound boy.

24 January 1885
Mrs. Eliza Davis, of Wyoming, died on Thursday of heart disease, aged 79 years. Mrs. Davis was one of the pioneers of this county, having come here in 1836.

24 January 1885
Mr. and Mrs. Josiah R. Holden will celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of their wedding this afternoon at the residence of their son, E. G. D. Holden, 37 Winter street, where they will be pleased to receive their friends.

24 January 1885
DIED.
SINCLAIR – In this city, January 22, Thompson Sinclair, aged 65 years and 7 months.  Funeral from St. Mark’s church, Sunday, Jan. 23, at 2:30 p.m. Friends of the family are invited to attend.

27 January 1885
The funeral services of the late Mrs. R. Candlish, who died at Fond du Lac, Wis., will be held at the First Reformed Church this afternoon at 2 o’clock.

27 January 1885
A Sudden and Singular Death.
The sudden death of a child belonging to a family named Jackson, on Grandville avenue, on Sunday, caused some excitement in that neighborhood and brought unlooked for grief to the heart of its parents.  The child, a female of four months, was laughing in its mother’s arms fifteen minutes before its death, and expired without giving any indications of sickness.  A sudden pallor overspread its countenance, its heart ceased to beat and without a spasm or muscular convulsion, life became extinct. From the time of its birth to the moment of its death the child had the appearances of good health, never having been sick. Dr. Locher was summoned immediately and arrived ten minutes after it had ceased to breathe.  He found the parents trying to restore life by bathing, but without avail.  The doctor expressed the opinion that death was caused by heart disease. No coroner’s inquest or post-mortem was held.

27 January 1885
​JELINCK VERSUS JELINCK.
More Matrimonial Infelicity Brought to the Notice of the Courts.
Frank Jelinck, a tailor of this city, residing at No. 229 Sixth street, filed, a bill for divorce yesterday before Judge Parrish of the Superior Court. This is his plaint: About the 31st day of May, 1880, he married Anna Vokurka, at the city of Chicago, and they lived together as husband and wife until about August 13, 1883. One child, Rosa Jelinck, now aged three years and upwards, came to brighten the bower of love, but without effect. After the date last named Cupid winged his flight and Anna, it is asserted, began without cause to abuse and maltreat her liege lord, refusing to perform her household duties, and calling the said Jelinck all manner of vile names and using profane and vulgar language too indecent to be written. Jelinck avers he tried to reason with the said Anna and effect a reconciliation, but without effect, she persisting in her headstrong course and averring she could live without him and make her own living. Since that hot day in August, Jelinck avers his wife has acquired the habit of almost daily swearing at and cursing him, calling him a “traitor” and other like names, intimating thereby that he was untrue to her. By reason of all these charges Jelinck solemnly says his life has been made miserable with her and one prolonged burden, and this too though both are comparatively young people in their prime of life and in the enjoyment of good health.

28 January 1885
​The mother of ex-Judge C. E. Perkins died in this city Monday night.

28 January 1885
DIED.
PERKINS. – Lydia M. Perkins, wife of Cyrus E. Perkins, Sr., in this city, Tuesday, January 27, in the sixtieth year of her age.  The funeral services will be conducted from the family residence, 145 Jefferson avenue, Thursday at 2 p.m.  Friends of the family invited.

30 January 1885
Wedding Bells.
Mr. Henry Huber was married to Clara Maritini yesterday, at his residence on Ionia street, by Justice John W. Holcomb.  Adolph Leitelt, Mr. Lendenstein, and a number of the friends of the contracting parties were present to wish them continued prosperity.  An ample collation was spread, and a pleasant afternoon was enjoyed by all.

30 January 1885
DIED.
BEATTIE. – Margaret A., wife of Patrolman Chas. H. Beattie, died at 12 o’clock, Jan. 29, at her home, 101 Canal street, aged 29 years and 9 months.  The funeral services will be held on Saturday, the hour to be announced hereafter.

31 January 1885
The funeral services of Mrs. Margaret A. Beattie will be conducted from the family residence, 101 Canal street, this afternoon at 10:30 o’clock.

31 January 1885
DIED.
BIGGS – At the residence of her father, L. M. Page, College avenue, Adeline G. Biggs, wife of William Biggs, of Ashland.  Funeral from her father’s residence on Sunday at 2 p.m.

4 February 1885
Wants a Divorce.
Irene Gates, a citizen of Kent County, commenced suit for a divorce from Aaron Gates in the Circuit Court yesterday.  The two were married Sept. 17, 1873, and lived together until about June 16, 1884, when the former left her husband because of cruel treatment and abuse, as is alleged in the bill. Three children, aged ten, eight and three years, were the fruits of the union.

5 February 1885
A Fatal Fall.
A man named M. J. Murdock, aged 35 years, traveling salesman for G. S. Magaw & Co., of Chicago, fell over a railing on the third floor in Albert’s hotel, No. 142 Canal street, in this city, yesterday morning about 2 o’clock, and sustained such injuries to his skull as to produce death five hours afterward. It is supposed the deceased had risen to obtain a drink of water and became confused, with the above fatal result.  An inquest will be held to-day by Coroner Bradish.  His friends in Chicago were notified by Superintendent Perry yesterday.

6 February 1885
Death of R. E. Abbott.
The death of R. E. Abbott, which occurred yesterday morning, was not a surprise to his intimate friends who had been familiar with the condition of his health for the past two years.  The disease which brought about his death was contracted two years ago while hunting on the Au Sable river.  He then fell into the river and caught a severe cold, which gradually grew into a disease of the lungs.  He had labored heroically and patiently, never giving up hope of a permanent recovery.  Death came upon him steadily and easily, and early yesterday morning he breathed his last.  Mr. Abbott was for a number of years a representative of the L. S. & M. S. railroad in this city, and in that position was capable, efficient and popular, making a firm friends of every one he came in contact with.  Whole-souled, affable, generous “Dick” Abbott, as he was known by many, will live long in the memory of a host of friends and acquaintances.  He leaves a family consisting of a wife and four children.  The funeral will probably be held Saturday morning.

9 February 1885
Mrs. Fagan, a woman in destitute circumstances and very poor health, fell down stairs in the Mohrhard block Saturday and fractured her shoulder blade.

9 February 1885
The remains of M. J. Murdock, the Chicago travelling man who met death from a fall at Alberts Hotel, Wednesday morning, was taken to Ingersol, Ont., for burial on Saturday.
Miss Ary Freligh gave a pleasant party to some sixty of her young friends at the residence of her grandfather, 257 Lyon street, Saturday afternoon. The occasion was Miss Ary’s tenth birthday.

11 February 1885
Miss Carrie, daughter of F. W. Wurzburg, and Mr. Klein, of New York, were married at St. Mark’s Catholic church yesterday. A reception was given at the family residence, 38 Summer street, after the ceremony.

13 February 1885
DIED
MORTON – Died on the 11th inst., A. B. Morton, of Dorr Center, Allegan county, aged 80 years.

15 February 1885
Jennie J. Bates was granted a decree of divorce in the Superior Court Saturday, from Schuyler N. Bates.

16 February 1885
The funeral services of Miss Julia Weirich, daughter of Peter Weirich, of 296 West Bridge street, were held yesterday afternoon, at 2 o’clock, from the family residence. Miss Julia, aged 14, was much beloved and the funeral services were largely attended.

16 February 1885
Death of Mrs. Whittamore
The death of Mrs. Laura Whittamore was announced from the pulpit of the First Presbyterian church last night. She was afflicted with paralysis and had laterly returned from Grand Ledge, whither she went in hopes of improving her health. She died at the residence of her son, Mr. David Arnott, 71 Broadway, at 7 p.m. yesterday. Notice of the funeral will be given later.

17 February 1885
Death of a Respected Lady
After a protracted and painful illness, Mrs. Laura Whittemore died on Sunday night at the residence of David Arnott, 71 Broadway. Mrs. Whittemore had made this city her home for more than twenty years and during that time had won a large circle of friends who esteemed her noble qualities of character. She was 59 years of age and leaves a daughter, Mrs. Arnott, two sisters, Mrs. Clark Russell, or Grand Ledge, and Lucinda Hazeltine, of Ohio, and as many brothers, Worthy Perry and L. Perry, of Bay City. The funeral will be held at the residence of Mr. Arnott afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.

17 February 1885
Ella Tobins, aged three years, 48 West Bridge street, scarlet fever. So read the report of the Board of Health for yesterday.

17 February 1885
Sharpe vs Sharpe
A Late Marriage Which May End in Early Divorce
An interesting case was disclosed by the records of office business in the Circuit Court in this city yesterday. Mary A. Sharpe, aged 50 years, filed a complaint for a bill of divorce from James Sharpe, aged 72 years, to whom she was married on the 16th of October last. Mary says that after persistent appeals from James she finally consented to marry him, but only on condition that he should take her to the Chicago Exposition. To this he consented and they were married. The oratrix sets forth that they went to Chicago, and that James, disregarding the solemnity of his marriage vow, did on the said 16th of October, 1884, at the Commercial Hotel in Chicago, ill-treat, beat and misuse her; choked her and threatened to throw her out of the window from the fourth story; used indecent and insulting language, and thereafter he was so violent and abusive in conduct that she was frightened so much that she went to the parlor of the hotel and slept during that night. He left her there without paying bills and abandoned her.

17 February 1885
DIED
LOWELL – At his residence, No. 579 Turner street, at 12 m., Feb. 16, Hudson R. Lowell, in the sixty-first year of his age. Funeral from his residence on Thursday, at 2 p.m. All friends of th deceased and members of the order of Chosen Friends, are invited to attend.

18 February 1885
Rompka Vanderwonde, aged fifteen, was sentenced to the State Industrial School by Judge Holmes yesterday.

18 February 1885
Nelson Woods, alias John Smith, was arrested by Detective Connolley last evening on a warrant for larceny. He is charged with stealing clothing, buffalo robes and bedding from the Bridge Street House. He is an “old-timer” and has traveled frequently between this city and Ionia.

18 February 1885
Mrs. J. M. Sligh has gone to Chicago to attend the funeral of her brother, Joseph G. Hill, who was formerly a resident of this city.

18 February 1885
The marriage of Miss Nellie A. Noacre and James D. Wadsworth is announced for Wednesday evening, March 4, at the residence of Wm. Boughton, 169 Mt. Vernon street.

18 February 1885
Born on a Cold Day
Good old grandma Severance, who resides with John A. Bovyer on Mt. Vernon street, celebrated her seventy-fifth birthday yesterday. She was born Feb. 17, 1809, on a day known in Massachusetts, her native State, as “cold Friday.” This date is recorded in the books of the historical societies of Massachusetts as the coldest ever known in the United States.

19 February 1885
Violently Insane and Taken to Jail
Henry Cargill, son of H. N. Cargill, of the Board of Health, is a cigarmaker and for some time past has been working at this trade in Muskegon. On Monday morning he went suddenly insane at the Arlington Hotel and attached a traveling man with a knife, and it was with difficulty that he was overpowered and taken to jail. At the jail he seized a fork and attempted to stab the daughter of the Sheriff and afterward attached the Sheriff with a stool. He was brought to this city and taken to his father’s house, but grew worse and yesterday became so violent that his friends were obliged to call in the police to help manage him, and it was finally concluded to take him to jail where he could be handled with more safety. He was accordingly removed to the jail and his case will be investigated by physicians, if possible, to-day.

20 February 1885
One case of scarlet fever was reported to the Board of Health yesterday – Celia Hickey, aged 6 years, 539 South Division street.

20 February 1885
DIED
JOHNSON – At her late residence, No. 80 West Bridge street, at 6 o’clock last evening, Mrs. John Johnson, aged 49 years. Funeral services at St. James Church, at 9 o’clcok Friday morning.

21 February 1885
Death of Mrs. Courtney
Mrs. Catherine Courtney died at her residence in this city, 50 Dayton street, yesterday at 12 o’clock, noon, of cancer. Mrs. Courtney was born in Longford, Ireland, in 1821. She moved with her husband, Bernard Courtney, to this city in 1844, where she has since resided. Mr. C., since deceased, was the discoverer and opener of the Emmet, now the Noble, plaster mine, in this city, and in this difficult work at that early day he was constantly aided and encouraged by his faithful wife. In fact, to her encouragement and aid may be attributed the establishment of this new industry in this city. Mrs. Courtney was a kind and indulgent mother, highly respected, and a prominent member of the St. James Catholic church. The funeral services will be conducted from the above named church on Monday at 9 a.m.

21 February 1885
Ida Kelly, aged five years, 126 Grandville avenue, and Pearl Tobias, aged five years, 45 West Bridge street, were reported to the Board of Health yesterday, as ill with scarlet fever.

24 February 1885
Mrs. Alice Hubbard, wife of the musician, Harry Hubbard, died Sunday evening, of consumption, at their rooms on Ionia street. The remains will be taken to Middleville today for interment.

26 February 1885
Contagious diseases reported – Amanda Rahn, 78 Bartlett street, diphtheria, and Lillie Ravelle, 578 Scribner street, scarlatina.

26 February 1885
The remains of Morris Barth, who was fatally injured in the railroad collision near Albuquerque, New Mexico, are expected to arrive here to-day.

27 February 1885
The funeral of Morris Barth, will occur at 2 o’clock to-day from the residence of J. Barth, corner of Sheldon and Island streets.

27 February 1885
The funeral services of Isaac Simmons, who died at his residence, 305 Turner street, Wednesday evening, will be conducted from the Second Street M. E. Church Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.

28 February 1885
Three cases of measles were reported to the Board of Health yesterday. Esene and Marian Follett, at 103 South Lafayette street, and J. P. Zeck, 54 West Broadway.

28 February 1885
The funeral services of Abraham M. DeBoe, who died at his residence, corner of West Leonard and Scribner streets, Thursday, will be conducted from the Wesleyan Methodist Church to-morrow, at 10:30 a.m.

28 February 1885
Arrested for Bastardy
Stephen Rickerd, who was acting as bartender at Robey’s saloon on Pearl street, was arrested last evening by Detective Gast on a warrant charging him with bastardy. The complaint was made by Louisa Zimmer, a good-looking German girl who occupies rooms on Canal street. She affirms that Rickerd is the father of her male child, which was born Aug. 1, last, and is now living. Rickerd was released on bail to appear before Judge Holmes in Police Court this morning at 9 o’clock. The warrant for his arrest was issued soon after the birth of the child, but he being absent from the city and in New Orleans for the past three months, it was not served until his return to this city was made known yesterday.

28 February 1885
DIED
DeBOE – Abraham M. DeBoe, February 26, corner West Leonard and Scribner streets, aged 24 years and 3 months. Funeral at the Wesleyan Methodist Church, on Sunday, 10:30 a.m.

2 March 1885
Wanted to be Arrested.
Frank King approached Officer Chas. Connolley yesterday forenoon and said he wished to be arrested and taken to headquarters, as he was wanted there. He had engaged in a quarral with Geo. Perdu, colored, and conducted himself in such a manner that Perdu had assured him he would be arrested, and he chose to give himself up. He was accordingly arrested on a charge of being disorderly, was taken to police headquarters and from thence to jail. At the former place a large butcher or bread knife was taken from him, with which, as Perdu claims, he intended to carve him. There is a lady in the case, and the developments will undoubtedly prove interesting. Perdu will enter a complaint against King this morning.

2 March 1885
The Last Rites.
The funeral services of the late Supervisor Simmons was largely attended yesterday from the Second street Methodist Church, of which denomination he had been a life-long and earnest member. The services were conducted by the Rev. J. W. Miller, and were solemn and impressive. The pall-bearers were: A. J. Rose, J. D. Robinson, Ira Currier, John Whitworth, Baker Borden and Joseph H. Bennett. The Board of Supervisors acted in a body. The remains were deposited beside those of his wife and several children, in the family lot in Greenwood Cemetery.

2 March 1885
DIED.
MEEHAN – In this city at 58 Calder street, February 28, 1885, Mrs. James Meehan, aged 56 years. Funeral from St. Andrew’s Cathedral this morning at 9 o’clock.

3 March 1885
A child of Mr. Havis, 206 Kent street, was reported ill with scarlet fever to the Board of Health yesterday.

3 March 1885
The wedding of Miss Ella Vander Haden and Gerbert W. Webber, took place at the residence of the bride’s parents, in Ionia, last evening. Miss Vander Haden has many warm friends in this city.

3 March 1885
DIED.
COLLINS – At this home, corner Spring and Goodrich streets, Sunday morning, March 1, Sinnon Collins, aged 75 years. Funeral from St. Andrew’s Cathedral, Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock.

4 March 1885
Caroline Onslow, aged 6, 493 Jefferson avenue, was reported ill with diphtheria to the Board of Health yesterday.

5 March 1885
Ettie Cramer, diphtheria, 166 Jefferson avenue, and Mary Pulcher, scarlet fever, 78 Clinton street, were the case of contagious diseases reported to the Board of Health yesterday.

6 March 1885
Hattie L. Hunt has filed a bill in the Circuit Court asking for a divorce from her husband, George F. Hunt. They were married in 1878 and lived together until 1883, when she left him, because he had become addicted to drunkenness, neglected her, and spent what little money he earned on divers other women.

6 March 1885
Hendrika Roelofs also asks Judge Montgomery to legally separate her from her husband Gerrit, alleging that he treated her with such extreme cruelty that she was compelled to flee to her relatives for protection. They were married in this city in March, 1883, and lived together until February, 1885.

6 March 1885
He Forged Gilders.
A Hollander named Claus Heckner, who has resided upon Grandville avenue for the past seven or eight months, was arrested by Detective Gast yesterday. He was formerly from the territory of the Netherlands and is charged with forging 2,500 gilders while a resident of the city of Leens. He was turned over to Beebe G. McDonald, United States Marshal of the Southern District of New York, who came here on purpose for him and who started for the metropolis with his prisoner yesterday afternoon. Heckner is a man about 26 years old and has a family consisting of a wife and three children.

7 March 1885
In a bill filed in the Superior Court, Sarah Scholz asks the judge to annul her marraige with Ignatius Scholz, which occurred in this city in 1855, for the reason that at that time he was so nearly insane as to be incapable of contracting marriage. They lived together until 1865, when he became violently insane, and was taken to the Kalamazoo Asylum, where he yet remains, and is pronounced incurable. They have one child, Amelia, now 26 years of age.

7 March 1885
CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.
One Case of Small-Pox Reported to the Board of Health.
Three cases of contagious diseases were reported to the Board of Health yesterday, “Joey” and “Baby” Carr, 62 Summit street, whooping cough, and John L. Bradford, 45 Cass street, small-pox. Mr. Bradford is a traveling salesman for John Caulfield, and does not know where he contracted the disease. He recently returned from an extended trip and thinks that he must have been exposed in a sleeping car. Dr. Griswold reported the case, and the Board of Health at once took measures to isolate the patient and prevent others from exposure. Mr. Bradford has a wife and three children, and hoping to prevent their contracting the disease he was removed to a room in the upper part of the house and placed in charge of a nurse. The house was quarantined and a guard placed about it, which will be maintained day and night. With these measures carefully carried out the members of the Board hope to confine the disease to the case reported, or at least to the family afflicted. President Dykema said that as the Board took charge of the case before the disease had reached the stage where it is most contagious he felt quite sure that the other members of the family would not be attacked.

9 March 1885
John L. Bradford, who is sick with smallpox at 45 Cass street, is a traveling salesman for a New York dry goods house.

9 March 1885
More Extreme Cruelty.
Henrietta Vetting has filed a bill in the Superior Court, asking for a divorce from Cornelius Vetting. They were married in November, 1883, and lived together until January last. Have no children of their own, but in June last adopted a baby named John Hardy, and had his name changed to Peter Vetting. Both want possession of the baby, and Cornelius asks the court for a writ of habeas corpus, with which to have the child brought into court, its adopted mother having left it with one of her friends, who refuses to give it up. Henrietta says that he has broken his marriage vows, by treating her with the most extreme cruelty, and recites a long list of the most vile and reproachful names and expressions, with which he has been in the habit of addressing her.

9 March 1885
Met Death in a Steam Chest.
Fred. Rustan is Scalded to Death Almost Instantly.
A terrible and fatal accidend occurred yesterday forenoon at the factory of the Grand Rapids Veneer and Panel Company, on North Front street, about 11 o’clock a.m. Fred Rustan, who has charge of the steaming of the logs, was found dead upon the floor of the steam box by his fellow workmen. The door to the box is a heavy one and opens upward with a crane and lever. Rustan had stepped just within the box, when a gust of wind loosened the door and blew it shut. He was immediately overcome by the heat and suffocated. Ned Sigler, an employee, saw Rustan enter the steam box, saw the door shut and immediately gave an alarm. Geo. Kingsworth came to his aid and the two opened the door as soon as they could, and, although less than give minutes had intervened, when Rustan was taken out life was extinct. He was literally cooked alive, so that the skin and flesh came off from the dead body. The police and coroner were notified, and undertaker Koch was summoned to care for the remains. The body was taken to 135 Muskegon street, where the unfortunate man boarded. He was a Swede and a single man, about 38 years of age. The only known relative in this country is a sister, who resides somewhere in Pennsylvania. Rustan was a steady and industrious man, and in his trunk were found $26 in cash and $569 in notes and mortgages. The coroner’s inquest will be held this evening, the following gentlemen composing the jury: A. L. Jordan, L. B. Bradish, E. W. Hamilton, James Hennessey, D. A. Hufford and Geo. Locke.

9 March 1885
A CRUEL HUSBAND
Treats Like a Brute the One he Should Love and Cherish.
Yesterday morning Anton Mechner, a stone-cutter, residing at 90 West Broadway, was arrested on complaint of his wife for being disorderly. Mechner had just spent a night at headquarters and paid costs and fine, $5.35, for being drunk, when he was arrested by Detective Connolley on the above charge. Yesterday morning about 1:30 o’clock a lad some twelve years of age hurried into police headquarters and informed Sergeant Johnson that his step-father was drunk and was pounding his mother. Among other things, the brutal husband had seized hold of his mother’s ear-ring and pulled it and the flesh from her ear. In ten of fifteen minutes the drunken husband staggered into headquarters and a few moments later the wife. The brute is a big, stout, burly fellow and the woman a little and frail body, plain spoken and earnest. The blood was flowing from her ear as she related her husband’s persistent and prolonged abuse. Mechner will be arraigned in Police Court this morning.

9 March 1885
Brought Homes a Corpse.
The funeral services of Otis V. DeWolf, who died at Linwood, O., Feb. 27, from injuries received in a railway accident, were conducted from the residence of J. W. DeWolf, in Grand Rapids township, on Sunday, at 4 o’clock p.m. Mrs. Mary L. Doe, of Lansing, mother of the deceased, was present at the funeral, as well as a large number of other relatives and friends.

11 March 1885
The funeral of W. H. Pittswood, of Mitchell, Dakota, and formerly of this city, is to occur from the residence of D. C. Simmons, 188 Fourth avenue, at 2 o’clock this afternoon.

11 March 1885
Anton Mechler, the German arrested for being disorderly, and whose disorderly conduct consisted in brutally beating his wife, was arraigned in Police Court yesterday. He will reflect over his actions in jail for the next twenty days.

11 March 1885
Respects to the Dead.
The funeral services of the late Geo. H. Case were conducted from the Wesleyan M. E. church yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Henry Powers officiating. The church was filled with the friends of the deceased and the United Workmen and Order of Chosen Friends, of which Mr. Case was a member, attended the services in bodies.

12 March 1885
The Forger’s Family.
The family of Claus Heckel, the man who was arrested last week and started for Europe to answer a charge of forgery, is being cared for by the County Superintendents of the Poor. The Superintendents say that they can not understand how the familiy lived without applying for aid before the man was arrested, as they are not represented as destitute of everything, and want not only food and fuel, but clothing, bedding and furniture. Mrs. Heckel says that her father, who is rich, offered to pay two-thirds of the amount of her husband’s forgeries if his father would pay the balance, but Heckel senior refused to do so, saying that his son had committed a crime and should be punished.

13 March 1885
A little child of James Fox, 23 Cass street, is ill with scarlet fever.

13 March 1885
An Inhuman Act.
A Railroad Flagman Attempts to Ravish a Twelve-Year-Old Girl.
John Fitzgerald, who has been employed as flagman at the Third street crossing of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, was arraigned before Judge Holmes yesterday afternoon upon the charge of attempted rape. The complaining witness is Regina Plumber, who claims that Fitzgerald has been taking undue liberties with her twelve-year old daughter, Charlotte. In going to school the girl passes the small station house built for the especial use of the flagman, and on Wednesday afternoon, as she was returning from school, Fitzgerald stopped her and induced her to enter the house with him, where, she says, he took improper liberties with her. He had enticed her into his lair on a previous occasion and begun his inhuman work, when a train came along and he hastened out to tend the crossing. The girl by this means made good her escape. On Wednesday the fact of the girl’s entering the house became known to Mrs. Plumber, who, in company with another woman, hastened to the place. They found the door fastened and demanded admission. In a short time the door was unlocked and the inhuman brute and his victim walked outside. The girl’s clothes and features showed every proof that her account of the meeting was correct, and the two women then and there proceeded to chastise Fitzgerald. They fought him hard and in the struggle got much the best of him, throwing him down and pulling his hair from his head. After they were fairly tired out they left the place, and the mother entered a formal complaint against Fitzgerald. The accused is a man about forty-five years of age. He pleaded “not guilty,” and his trial will be commenced in Police Court this afternoon at 3 o’clock.

14 March 1885
Died in the Poor-House.
Lafayette Kimball, aged 59, died at the County Poor-house yesterday of paralysis. He had been a county charge since August, 1880, and for almost four years had been a helpless invalid, the lower half of his body being completely paralyzed. He was naturally a smart and quite well-informed gentleman and had been troubled for a number of years with rheumatism, which finally produced paralysis, and his means becoming exhausted he was obliged to go the poor house.

14 March 1885
Button Discharged.
The examinatio of Edward Button, accused of an attempt to ravish Lizzie Johnson on Wednesday evening last, was the drawing card at Police Court yesterday. The testimony of the three witnesses called for the defence was substantially the same as Button’s report of the affair, as published in The Telegram of Thursday. The testimony of Miss Johnson was about the same up to the time when she and Button were left alone in the room at Lon Morrision’s house, on Kent street. She claimed that while there Button used violence in forcing her upon the bed and holding his hand over her mouth to prevent her outcries. The court held that while Button was liable to great censure and could undoubtedly be proved guilty of an assault, the evidence was not sufficiently strong to prove an attempt to rape. Button was discharged.

16 March 1885
Two funeral services will be conducted from St. Andrew’s Cathedral to-day; that of Josephine Perry at 8 a.m., and that of Dennis Flood at 10 a.m.

18 March 1885
A boy named Ray Deitrich, aged 9 years, living in the Morey block on Pearl street, shot himself through the head with a pistol Monday.

18 March 1885
John Fitzgerald, the flagman charged with assault with intent to commit rape, was discharged from custody by Judge Homes yesterday. While the evidence showed he took improper liberties with the girl, there was not sufficient evidence to convict him of the charge specified in the declaration.

18 March 1885
Bad Berries.
It was yesterday reported to the County Superintendents of the Poor that a man named Mulberry, of Grand Rapids township, has left his family, consisting of a wife and three children, and departed for parts unknown. The family is in destitute circumstances and will have to be supported by the township. This man is said to be a brother to Samuel F. Mulberry, who was mentioned last week as having allowed his wife, who is sick with consumption, to be taken to St. Mark’s Home, to be cared for at the county’s expense.

19 March 1885
John S. Bannen, an Englishman, and Alderte Klooster, Hollander, were admitted to citizenship in the Circuit Court yesterday.

19 March 1885
Bertie Schroeder, of 34 Livingston street, aged three years, was reported to the Board of Health yesterday as ill with chicken-pox.

19 March 1885
An employee in Kusterer’s brewery named John Keohmon, who resides at the corner of College avenue and Beattie street, fell a distance of fifteen feet striking with his head on a brick floor. He was rendered insensible.

23 March 1885
The funeral services of Miss Bridgett Dillon will be held at St. Mary’s church, tomorrow, at 9 a.m.

24 March 1885
Nellie Goodrich, aged four years, corner of Allen and Court streets, is reported ill with scarlatina.

24 March 1885
Ned Sproat, aged eight years, 128 North Division street, ill with scarlatina, will be reported to the Board of Health to-day.

24 March 1885
The remains of Peter Johnson will arrive in this city to-day at 12:40 p.m. at the D. & M. depot. The body will be met by a committee of the K. and L. and escorted to the place of burial. All friends of the family are requested to attend.

25 March 1885
Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Byers are rejoicing over a ten-pound girl and grandpa Byers is exceedingly proud.

25 March 1885
After Twenty-One Years.
William Lark, by his attorney, E. S. Eggleston, yesterday filed a bill in the Superior Court, asking for a divorce from his wife Charlotte. They were married in Detroit in 1864 and lived together until St. Patrick’s Day, 1885. He says that while living in Big Rapids she neglected her domestic duties, to walk the streets in company with immoral men. He removed to this city in hopes that she would reform, but she has continued in her downward career until she is commonly called “French Lottie.” They have three children, a boy eight years old and two girls, aged 14 and 17 respectively, and he says she takes the girls to dances in houses of bad reputation. He asks for the care and custody of the boy, but seems willing to allow the girls to remain with their mother.

26 March 1885
IN MEMORIAM.
The History of a Well-Spent and Useful Life.
On the morning of the 19th inst., at a little past 8 o’clock, Mrs. E. W. Heth died at her home on South Division street, at the early age of 48 years. She had been failing in health for two years, but her disease had shown no alarming symptoms until the last few months. Not until compelled by the severity of the weather did she give up her accustomed practice of driving daily. She looked forward with expectation to the common Spring when she might resume this exercise believing it would bring back to her the health and enjoyment of former days. But this for her was not to be. At such an hour as she thought not the Son of man came for her.
Although feeble, she was able to be about the house, looking after the wants of her household. Even on the last day of her life she walked from the sitting-room to her sleeping apartments at the usual hour for retiring. During her sojourn with us, by her frank manner and cheerful words she won a place in the hearts of a large circle of friends.
She lived the life of a devoted Christian having first confessed Christ while in youth at Hartford, Washington county, N.Y.; uniting with the Baptist church there, and afterward at Pittsford, Monroe county, N.Y., where she was married. She held fast to the confession of her faith without wavering. In 1867 she moved with her husband and children to Grand Rapids, where she united with the Baptist Church here.
She remained with them until the formation of the South Congregational Church near her home. As it was the greatest desire of her life to see her children followers of the Saviour and believing her labor and influence would best serve God’s purpose of her life she was among the first to unite with that church. Here as member of the choir and teacher in the Sabbath School she continued her labor of love while strength lasted.
In the social life of the church she was among the foremost. The announcement that a “social” would be held at her house was sufficient to warrant an enjoyable evening.
God bestowed many of life’s blessings upon her, but she was also acquainted with the hardships of life. As the mother of eight children there was need of patience, and in this did her love always triumph. The words of Solomon in description of the virtuous woman find application in many respects to her life.
She will be greatly missed in the neighborhood and in the church, and most of all an absent place in the household. But to those who sorrow most is also the most of consolation, and they thank God that so good a wife and mother was given to them. The first of this family to be called away, she has gone to occupy the Heavenly mansion prepared for them, and in that Heavenly home is awaiting to receive them unto herself.
The funeral was helf from the residence, the Rev. B. F. Sargent officiating, and was largely attended, nearly two hundred friends of the family being present and most of them followed the remains to the Valley City cemetery.
The “Ladies Aid Society,” of which she was a member, provided a beautifl floral harp for the occasion; Mrs. J. H. Parker and Mrs. D. L. Campau, a sickle. The singing was conducted by Mrs. Sargent and Mrs. Lincoln. The pall-bearers were: Marcus W. Bates, Bruce W. Lincoln, S. L. Turner, William Walker and George Outhouse.

26 March 1885
Arthur Frost, aged eighteen months, is reported to the Board of Health ill with whooping cough.

26 March 1885
FOUND DEAD IN BED.
A Muskegon Lumberman Dies in His Room at Sweet’s Hotel.
Last Monday a fine-appearing gentleman, about thirty-five years of age, entered Sweet’s Hotel and registered as Anthony Lesage, Muskegon. He was assigned to room 76. He was up and around the hotel Monday, but complained of not feeling well. Tuesday afternoon the housekeeper, whose room adjoined that occupied by Mr. Lesage, heard him vomiting in his room, but thought nothing of it. After this he was about the hotel again, and in the evening about 8:30 o’clock started to retire. In the hallway he met the housekeeper, who noticed he was pale and staggered as though intoxicated. He said to her: “You may think I have been drinking because I stagger so. I never drink anything. I was very sick about a week ago with congestive chills.” She asked is she could get him a cup of tea, but he replied “No; I’ve had my dinner and am going to bed.” Yesterday morning about 10 o’clock Mr. Bridge, the clerk, went to his room to awaken him, but received no answer. After gaining access to the room Lesage was found lying in bed upon his right side, apparently lifeless. His head rested upon his right hand, and the bed clothing was undisturbed. Dr. Best was immediately summoned and pronounced him dead, from what cause he did not exactly know.
The body was warm, but the doctor concluded from all indications he had been dead some two hours. Everything about the room was in order, and although there was a slight bruise upon the right temple, all appearances tended to indicate that death was painless. On his person was found a gold hunting-case watch, a purse containing a little over $1 in change and receipts of the Mutual Masonic Benefit Association of Grand Rapids, and Northwestern Association of Chicago; also receipts for dues of the Knights or Pythias of Muskegon.
Mr. Lesage was head-sawyer in the mill of Torrent & Arms, at Muskegon, was well-known and esteemed. The news of his death was sent to Muskegon yesterday morning and last evening Messrs. W. H. Cogswell and E. S. Montgomery, of that city, members of the Knights of Pythias Lodge, and also two former associates in the mill arrived in this city and took charge of the remains, which will be taken to Muskegon this forenoon at 9 o’clock. Inquiry at the office of the Mutual Benefit Association in this city showed that Mr. Lesage’s life was insured for $2,000 in this association, and that all dues had been paid. The K. of P. members from Muskegon think he carried an equal amount of insurance in the lodge and are quite certain the dues are all paid there.

27 March 1885
Miss Ada Hunt, daughter of James Hunt, is quite dangerously ill with erysipelas.

27 March 1885
The remains of Anthony Lesage, who died at Sweet’s Hotel Tuesday morning, were taken to Muskegon yesterday, escorted by Masonic and Knights of Pythias committees.

27 March 1885
Lottie and Harvey Irving, 272 Indiana street, aged four and six years respectively, are reported ill with scarlatina, and William Meyer, 74 Quimby street, aged 15, has the chicken pox.

27 March 1885
A 6-year old daughter of Lendeert Luiksart, of 364 West Leonard street, was injured so severely by being hit by a “bob” sled with which some children were coasting last Monday, that she died on Wednesday.

28 March 1885
Fred. B. Oliver, of Steele, Dak., and Miss Alida A. Graham, of this city, were married at the residences of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Graham, 39 Brainard street, Thursday evening last. Rev. S. Graves performed the ceremony.

28 March 1885
Contagious diseases reported yesterday: J. V. Engel, aged 30, 4 Blickle Place, typhoid fever; Henry Compton, aged 7, 199 Lafayette street, scarlatina; and a two-month-old son of Wm. H. Warren, 257 Straight street, tubercular meningitis.

28 March 1885
MARRIED.
OLIVER – GRAHAM. In this city, March 26, by Rev. S. Graves, at the residence of the bride’s parents, 39 Brainard street, Miss Alida A. Graham and Mr. Fred B. Oliver of Steele, D. T.

30 March 1885
The will of August Weikam was filed in the Probate Court on Saturday. It bequeaths all the property to his widow, Wilhelmina, at her death, to be divided equally among their seven children.

30 March 1885
Drunkenness – Desertion.
Sarah E. McMillan has filed a bill for divorce from James McMillan. She says that he is an habitual drunkard, and that she has paid his fine for drunkenness in Police Court several times. He is now serving a twenty-days sentence for drunkenness. They have one child, Viola, 15 years of age.

30 March 1885
Rhoda J. Moffat, of Cannon, asks for a divorce from William B. Moffat. They were married at Cannonsburg in 1880 and she says he deserted her two years ago. No children.

31 March 1885
Cora Kelly, aged 11, 488 North Ionia street, is reported ill with diphtheria.

31 March 1885
Mrs. James Kennedy obtained a divorce from her husband a few weeks ago. It is not stated that they were remarried last week.

31 March 1885
Gysbert Van Dommellen, Collector of the First Ward, died on Monday night. His death resulted from injuries received on the railroad some time ago.

31 March 1885
Merritt and James Gilbert, dependent and neglected children, were yesterday ordered sent to the State Public School at Coldwater, in the Probate Court. The parents are county charges in Solon Township.

31 March 1885
A License Revoked.
Dr. Daniel Winter yesterday filed in the County Clerk’s office a revocation of his certificate acknowledging that Iman Wisse was a medical student practicing under his direction. Wisse was arrested last summer for practicing without a licence and claimed that he was a student with Dr. Albright.

31 March 1885
DIED.
VAN DOMMELEN – On Sunday, the 29th inst., G. W. Van Dommelen, aged 30. Funeral will be held from P. Ringelberg’s residence on Grandville avenue, Wednesday, at 2 o’clock p.m.

1 April 1885
George Lane, an Englishman, was admitted to citizenship in the Circuit Court yesterday.

1 April 1885
J. Carey, aged 24, of 84 Monroe street, measles, was an entry in the Board of Health office yesterday.

1 April 1885
It is rumored that Deputy Sheriff John Platte is soon to marry Miss Julia Farrell, of Ada, and go to New Orleans on his wedding tour.

1 April 1885
Iman Wisse, the medical student whose license to practice was revoked by Dr. Winter, filed a certificate yesterday stating that he is now entitled to practice as a student, under the direction of Dr. L. E. Best.

1 April 1885
Dr. Sala Smith’s Will.
The last will and testament of Dr. Sala Smith, late of Grand Rapids township, was filed in the Probate Court yesterday. It bequeaths all his property, real, personal and mixed to his widow, Sarah Maria, during her lifetime unless she re-marries. In the event of her death or re-marriage, $200 is to be paid to the Wesleyan Methodist connection of America, at Wasioja, Wisconsin, and $200 to the Wesleyan connection at Wheaton, Ill., the remainder to be equally divided between his two sons, Emmet G. and Fred E. Smith

2 April 1885
A Little Girl Burned to Death Northwest of Cedar Springs.
A most horrible and shocking accident occurred at Rose & Carner’s mill, about eight miles northwest of Cedar Springs, on Saturday last, March 28. It appears that a number of children were amusing themselves making gum from pitch by heating it on a stove, at a neighbor’s house, and among the children was Jennie, a little daughter of Mrs. Caroline Wilson, aged ten years. All went merry till the pitch, becoming overheated, ignited in the dish, and for fear the house might be set on fire a scramble was made to get it out of doors, and in the attempt little Jennie happened to get some of the burning mass on her clothes. Seeing her danger, and before anyone could get to her, she started down the road for home, her pursuers being unable to overtake her till she had reached her own dooryard. By this time the flames had well-nigh done their work, and in less time than it takes to write this, the poor girl was literally roasted, the little sufferer living but about four hours afterwards. Those who saw the remains say they were a most sickening, ghastly sight. The widowed mother is almost frantic over the horrible catastrophe. – Cedar Springs Clipper.

2 April 1885
A Fatal Accident.
A singular and sad accident occurred at Widdicomb’s factory yesterday forenoon. A boy named Peter Marshall, aged 14 years, was at work in the factory, when a knife flew out of a shaper and struck him in the left breast with such force as not only to penetrate the heart but to pass entirely through his body killing him of course instantly. The boy’s father lives at 411 Third street. Coroner Bradish was summoned and had the remains removed to the father’s house. A jury was summoned and an adjournment taken until 10 o’cock this morning.

4 April 1885
Dennis Hull, for several years an engineer on the G. R. & I. R. R., died in Kalamazoo on Thursday from the effects of the removal of a tumor from his neck.

4 April 1885
Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Young have the sympathies of a large number of friends in the loss of their beautiful and attractive son Johnnie, who died yesterday morning.

4 April 1885
Dr. Best yesterday revoked the authority of Iman Wisse to practice as a medical student under his instructions. It is understood that the student is guilty of having made obscene and unprofessional remarks about his patients.

6 April 1885
The funeral services of Miss Frances Porter will be conducted from St. Mary’s Catholic Church this morning at 8 o’clock.

6 April 1885
Madison W. Cook, the insane Paris farmer, has been taken from the jail and is now stopping with his brother-in-law James H. Ford, 122 South Spring street.

6 April 1885
The resignation of W. L. Snyder, the principal of the Jefferson street school, who was accused of punishing Bertie Love in an inhuman manner, was accepted by the Board of Education Saturday .

6 April 1885
Moses D. Hembling, who was reported frozen to death in Dakota, has returned to this city alive and well.

7 April 1885
Miss Minnie Wallace, formerly of this city, and Mr. McKelp, of Muskegon, were married at Grand Haven yesterday.

9 April 1885
Another Divorce Wanted.
Ida Marvin filed a bill of complaint in the Superior Court yesterday praying that a divorce be granted her from her husband, Guy Marvin. They were married in Ottawa County March 7, 1876, and continued to live together until March 27, 1883, when, as the complainant charges, her husband cruelly and wickedly deserted her, and refused to provide for her support.

9 April 1885
Youthful Wanderers.
Reports of Lost Children Becoming of Daily Occurrence.
With the advent of Spring weather comes the desire to be out-of-doors to catch the sunlight. Even the little ones become thoroughly convinced it is their duty to take long walks for their health, and scarcely a day passes without a lost child’s being picked up on the streets.
Tuesday night a bright little boy, who gave his name as Gurvie De Vries, slept all night at police headquarters, and was not called for until nearly 10 o’clock yesterday.
Less than a week ago a little fellow, only five years old, was picked up by Mayor Belknap on Scribner street. The lad could not give his name or tell where he lived. Finally the Mayor asked the name of his school teacher, and this he gave readily. This clue was worked upon and the boy was returned to his parents, who live in the extreme southern part of the city and upon the East Side.
Two weeks ago parents residing on Spring street reported the loss of a four-year-old daughter, and when found the young lady was over two miles from home and was sure she had walked the entire distance.
Yesterday three children were reported lost and were afterwards picked up by patrolman and returned to their homes. Look out for the little ones, or else fasten a tag to them giving name and residence and let them loose.

9 April 1885
The Dead County Clerk.
Arrangements for the Funeral Ceremonies to be Held Today.
The funeral of County Clerk Godwin, whose sudden death caused such a shock to the community on Tuesday, will occur at 2 o’clock this afternoon from his late residence, No. 205 Jefferson avenue. All the county offices will be closed and the Circuit Court will adjourn in order to allow the officers and attorneys to attend the services. The deceased will be buried with Masonic honors, Grand River Lodge No. 34, of which the deceased was an honored member, conducting the ceremonies. The remains will be interred at Valley City Cemetery.
Orland H. Godwin was born in Wyoming township, in this county, and was about 39 years of age. His father, Wm. H. Godwin, was one of the earliest pioneer settlers, and for years represented his township on the Board of Supervisors. In early life he went to Kansas and learned the printer’s trade, and returning went to Maniste and started the first Democratic paper published in that district. He then came to this city and served four years as a member of the Board of Education from the Third Ward. Three years ago he was elected County Clerk on the Union ticket by a handsome majority, and was re-elected last fall. Mr. Godwin leaves a wife, two sons and a daughter to mourn his death. His other immediate relatives are two brothers, G. Chase Godwin, of this city and Augustine A. Godwin, of Wyoming, and four sisters, Mrs. W. Dunham, Mrs. Arthur Meigs, Mrs. D. W. Blackmer and Miss Ida Godwin.
He held an insurance policy of $1,000 in the Masonic Mutual and had a home nearly paid for. Mr. Godwin was a cheerful, whole-souled man and had a large circle of friends who will sincerely regret his sudden death.

10 April 1885
The Soldier’s Monument.
The Contract for its Construction Awarded Yesterday.
A contract was closed yesterday between the Soldier’s Monumental Company, of which Alderman Gilbert is chairman, and the White Bronze Company, of Detroit, for the construction of the monument. It is proposed to erect it in the triangle at the head of Monroe street. The design has been slightly changed and improved, and combines an artistic fountain at the base, and a monument above. The base is made to represent a fort with projecting guns throwing sprays of water. Above this are supporting pillars holding the basins – with panels showing military emblems of all the different arms of the service. The basins and figures throwing water are unique in design. The crowning figure will be a life size bronze soldier. On the prominent panels of the four sides are to be historic mottoes and sentiments of the war period, the names of many of the promiment battles and navel engagements. A peculiar feature will be the construction of a panel representing, in bas relief, a woman on a battle-field giving a wounded soldier a cup of water. It is said that this will be the first army recognition of woman’s devotion to the nation’s cause that has been made on any public monument erected since the war. It is expected that this will be, on the whole, one of the finest white bronze monuments ever erected in this country. The cost will be $3,100.

10 April 1885
A benefit dance will be given at Rose’s Hall, on West Bridge street, April 15, for Owen Ostrom, who has been sick and unable to work for a long time.

10 April 1885
In the Superior Court yesterday Mary E. DeRuyter was granted a decree of divorce from her husband, Cornelius H., on the ground of cruelty and desertion.

10 April 1885
Mrs. Charles Kelly, who was assaulted and injured Monday night, is seriously ill in consequence. Several of her teeth were broken and it is thought she was hit with a slingshot or similar weapon.

10 April 1885
DIED.
HOLMES. In this city, Wednesday, April 8, 1885, Florence E., wife of O. J. Holmes, of Gold street. The remains were taken to Constantine, the former home of the deceased, for interment.

10 April 1885
The Funeral.
The funeral of County Clerk Godwin was largely attended yesterday afternoon, nearly all the county and city officers were present, as well as a large number of citizens. Rev. Mr. Merriam, of the Park Congregational Church, conducted the religious services. More than one hundred members of the Masonic brotherhood were in attendance.

11 April 1885
The Death of an Old Resident.
Mrs. Bastian Sonke, mother of the mail-carrier, John Sonke, died yesterday afternoon, at the residence of Cornelius Sonke, on Spring street, of old age. Mrs. Sonke had been a resident of this city most of the time for thirty years past, and was known and respected by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. She had reached the ripe old age of 82 years. The funeral will be held at the Second Reformed Church, on Bostwick street, at 2 o’clock, next Monday afternoon. All friends are invited.

13 April 1885
The funeral of the late Mrs. Sonke will take place from the Bostwick Street Dutch Church at 2 o’clock this afternoon.

13 April 1885
Mrs. S. D. Bacon, wife of the Front street grocer, died Saturday evening of consumption. The remains will be taken to Niles today for interment.

13 April 1885
John Gray, the man arrested on Friday for stealing books, was sentenced to Ionia for ninety days in Police Court. He is an Irishman 51 years of age, and pretends to be a doctor.

14 April 1885
Emma Leech, aged 13 years, 266 Cass street, was reported by the Board of Health yesterday as ill with measles.

14 April 1885
Mrs. Louis Hart, who resides at room 128 Ledyard block, was assaulted by a stranger on North Front street last evening, about 8:30 o’clock. She gave an alarm and her assailant fled after striking her in the face and stomach. Her face was scratched and bleeding when she returned home.

15 April 1885
Arnold, William and Henry Beyer, aged two, five and seven, respectively, of 224 North Division street, are afflicted with chickenpox.

15 April 1885
Patrolman D. Bahen found Julia Kellogg on Summit street last evening in an apparent state of insanity and took her to headquarters. She was afterwards examined by Dr. Hake, who pronounced her insane, and she was removed to the jail.

17 April 1885
Lewis Pearl, aged seven, 365 South Lafayette street, is reported ill with measles.

17 April 1885
She Deserted Him.
John Harrison, of Tyrone township, asks the Circuit Court to divorce him from his wife, Rebecca. He says they were married in June, 1882, and she deserted him in September of the same year and has not returned, although often requested so to do. They have no children.

17 April 1885
In Jail for Whipping His Wife.
Deputy Sheriff McConnell, of Cedar Springs, yesterday lodged John Aller of that village in jail to serve a sixty-day sentence, in default of a fine of $25 and costs. Aller was convicted, before Justice Miller, of Cedar Springs, of having committed assault and battery upon his wife. They are an aged couple and have been in the habit of quarreling frequently for several years.

18 April 1885
Another Insane Person.
A young woman named Maggie Porter, of 23 Lincoln avenue, was taken to jail for safe keeping yesterday. She has been an inveterate smoker for some time past, and it is thought that this, with family troubles, has destroyed her reason. Her husband deserted her a few months ago. Her friends found it impossible to control her and turned her over to the authorities. Dr. Hake examined her and pronounced her insane.

18 April 1885
Edith E. Weston was granted a divorce from Charles E. Weston in the Superior Court yesterday.

18 April 1885
The Will of Chester Phillips
The will of the late Chester Phillips, of Byron Center, was filed in the office of the Judge of Probate yesterday. It bequeaths all his property to his widow during her lifetime and at her death it is to go to his daughter Eliza, in consideration of her having worked for her father and lent him money to pay for a house and lot. The will states that his other children, George M. Phillips, Florence E. Brittain, Hattie M. Haines, Lovina A. Lilley and W. W. Phillips, are not provided for in the will, but nevertheless are not forgotten.

20 April 1885
A Terrible Death.
A Brakeman’s First Day’s Work in the City Results Fatally.
As yard engine No. 12, of the Michigan Central road, was engaged in “making up” a freight train in the yards Saturday evening, one of the brakemen engaged was almost instantly killed. The accident happened about 9:30 o’clock, and just at the switch next south of the Hall street crossing. The brakeman was coupling cars at the time and the coupling being made at the switch his foot became fastened between the converging rails, and, before he could extricate it, the train backed against him. He was struck in the back, knocked down and the wheels ground one of his legs to atoms, crushed his right hip and also his stomach. He was carried into the Clapp building house and Dr. Johnson was summoned, but the man had just breathed his last as the doctor arrived, having lived some fifteen minutes after the accident. From letters found in the pockets of the dead man it is supposed his name is W. B. Fenton, and that his home is in Chase, Lake County, where he has a wife and two children living. He was about 35 years of age and this was his first day’s work for the Michigan Central Company. Undertaker Durfee and Coroner Bradish, subsequently summoned, took the body in charge and the Coroner will hold an inquest this afternoon.

21 April 1885
The Board of Health officers report read as follows yesterday: Ada Weston, aged 16, 214 Third avenue, measles; Lillie Hyatt, aged 5, 310 South Prospect street, diphtheria, and C. Rice, aged 17, 506 Hall street, measles.

21 April 1885
Another Sad Case of Insanity.
A young married man named John Reeves, who recently came to this city from Canada, was locked up at the jail yesterday afternoon for safekeeping, he being insane. It is a sad case. The young man’s friends state that he came here about two months ago in search of work at one of the furniture factories, but failing it preyed upon his mind so that he became deranged. He has a young wife who is soon to become a mother.

23 April 1885
John Reeves, the mildly insane young man, is to be taken to Belleville, Ont., where his parents reside.

24 April 1885
To Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Hoeksema, of 23 New street – a boy.

25 April 1885
A Narrow Escape.
A Switchman Escapes With His Head but Loses His Heel.
Yesterday afternoon Ed Merrills, a switchman employed in the Grand Rapids & Indiana yards, was riding on the tender of the switch engine, and as it came along near the freight house, he jumped off for the purpose of making a coupling. As he jumped Wash Davis, of the Freight Delivery and Transfer Line, stood in his way, but Merrills did not notice him until the two came together so forcibly as to knock Merrills down. He fell partially in front of the engine, but managed to get out of the way so that only the heel of his shoe was caught by the wheels. The engine was stopped as soon as possible, but the wheel passed over and smashed the heel of the shoe and crushed his foot just enough to disable him for a few days. It was a very narrow escape, and some of the people who witnessed it were terribly frightened – more so than Merrills.

27 April 1885
To Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Poole, 205 North Ionia street, a fourteen-pound boy.

27 April 1885
Jane, wife of Rev. Dr. Mulhern, died Saturday afternoon at the residence on Henry street.

27 April 1885
Robert Brown, of 321 North Ionia street, who was recently discharged from the Pontiac Asylum, is again insane and was taken to jail Saturday night.

27 April 1885
George Clark, who a few weeks ago deserted Lizzie Kent in this city, has been heard from in San Francisco. Lizzie is with her parents at Sand Lake.

28 April 1885
To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dawley, of 95 Madison street, an eight-pound girl.

28 April 1885
The funeral services of Mrs. Jane Mulhern, wife of Rev. Dr. Mulhern, will be held at the family residence, 88 Henry street, this afternoon at 2 o’clock Rev. I. Butterfield officiating.

29 April 1885
It is said that Miss Kate Walsh, of Calder street, ran away from home and has gone on the stage with Kate Claxton’s “Two Orphans” company in Chicago.

29 April 1885
James Deserted Her.
Genevra Johnson yesterday filed a bill in the Superior Court asking for a divorce from her husband James. They were married in 1870 at Casnovia. He deserted her at Kalkaska, in January 1882, and has since neglected to support her. They had two children neither of whom are living.

29 April 1885
One of the Bad Boys.
Mrs. Eliza Ailles, of 113 Carrier street, brought her fourteen-year-old stepson, Robert Ailles, to Police Headquarters at 1 o’clock this morning, and requested the officers to take care of him. She said she could not control him; that he ran around town nights, coming home late; that he kicked her and threatened to whip her; that her baby was sick, not expected to live until morning, and she was obliged to ask the officers to take care of the boy. Robert is evidently a bad boy. He told Sergeant Hurley that the reason he had trouble with his stepmother was because he did not like to go to school, but would rather run about town. Mr. Ailles, the boy’s father, is at work in a sawmill at Paris, Mecosta county.

30 April 1885
Margaret Cumings was granted a divorce from John Cumings in the Superior Court yesterday.

30 April 1885
On the ground that he treats her with extreme cruelty Cecelia E. Hook, of Wyoming township, asks for a divorce from Mark Hook. They have been married twenty-six years.

30 April 1885
Robert Ailles, the boy brought to headquarters by his stepmother, Tuesday night, was charged with assault and battery, yesterday morning, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to the Reform School until 18 years of age.

30 April 1885
Death of an Old Resident at Cadillac.
Benjamin C. Eaton, a member of the Kent County Old Residents’ Association, died at Cadillac yesterday morning. He was sixty -five years of age and came to this city in 1848, from Cairo, N.Y. He served in the army during the war, and was a pensioner. He leaves a wife and three children – W. W. Eaton, of Cadillac, and J. M. Easton and Mrs. A. G. Champlin, of this city. The remains will probably be brought to this city for burial, but the time for the funeral has not yet been fixed.

1 May 1885
The funeral of Benjamin C. Eaton will occur from St. Mark’s Church at 11 o’clock this morning. The remains will be taken to the church from the train, which arrives from the North at 10:25.

1 May 1885
Justice Brouwer issued a warrant yesterday for the arrest of Charles H. Latting, of Ada, for assault and battery. The complaint was made by Lillian Latting, his wife, who claims that he whipped her terribly.

1 May 1885
The remains of a Mr. Ryder, an Alpine farmer, who died at Ann Arbor, where he had been sent for treatment, arrived at the Union depot on the Central train yesterday morning, and were taken to Alpine for burial.

2 May 1885
A. Classel, aged 8 years, 148 Seventh street, scarlatina, was recorded in the Board of Health office yesterday.

2 May 1885
One More Divorce Wanted.
Nora E. Liddle, by her attorneys, McBride & Taylor, filed a bill in the Superior Court yesterday asking for a decree of divorce from William F. Liddle, on the ground that he is guilty of adultery, and obliges her to take in washing to support herself and eight-year-old son. She charges him with conduct not fit to be mentioned in print, and asks the Court to grant an injunction restrainging him from removing the child from her custory. They were married in this city by the Rev. Hildreth in 1875, and have lived here since.

4 May 1885
Fatally Burned.
While Ella Schwind, an eight-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Schwind, of 307 Bowery street, was playing with other children around a bonfire on Saturday night, her clothes caught fire and she was fatally burned. Medical aid was summoned and everything possible done to save her life and allay her terrible suffering, but she died at 9 o’clock last night.

5 May 1885
Cornelius Vetting, proprietor of the bottling works and saloon at 60 Canal street, died of consumption yesterday morning at the home of his sister on North Ionia street.

5 May 1885
O. C. Bush, formerly an old resident of this city, on Scribner street, arrived here yesterday morning with the remains of his wife, who died at Carthage, Kan. Mrs. Bush had been an invalid for several years and went to Kansas last summer in hopes that the changes would help her.

5 May 1885
Mathaeu Reiter’s Will.
The will of Mathaeus Reiter, of Alpine township, who died recently at the hospital at Ann Arbor, was filed in the Probate Court yesterday. It provides that all his personal property and his farm of eighty acres in Alpine township shall belong to his wife, Anna Reiter, so long as she shall remain a widow. Shall she marry or die a widow the farm shall pass into the hands of his oldest son, Peter, who shall own the same after he had given $1,000 to each of his other children, Michael, Mathaeus and Lana.

6 May 1885
Marinus Cornelisse, formerly a fish-dealer well known in this city, died at his home in Muskegon yesterday morning.

6 May 1885
It is announced that Miss Fanny Lyon, daughter of Farnham Lyon of Bancroft House, East Saginaw, and Arthus O. Poineer, Saginaw agent for R. G. Dunn & Co., are engaged to be married.

6 May 1885
DIED.
Knapp – at her residence, 50 Butterworth Ave., May 5, Lucretia H. Knapp. Funeral Thursday forenoon at 10 o’clock.

6 May 1885
Whisky Breaks Up a Home.
Elizabeth Hardy filed a bill of complaint in the Superior Court yesterday asking for a divorce from her husband, James Hardy. The complaint shows that the two were made one at Rome, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1873, and that they continued to live together until about Sept. 15, 1883, their union being blessed with five children. The oratrix shows that James was in the habit of coming home in a state of beastly intoxication and in this condition would cruelly beat and misuse her. He even threatened to kill her and by his acts showed every willingness to carry his threat into execution.

8 May 1885
John Bencher, 207 Summit street, measles, and Nellie DeYoung, 7 Prescott street, scarlet fever, were on the report at the office of the Board of Health yesterday.

8 May 1885
Maria M. Merz, wife of Martin Merz of 128 Jackson street, died yesterday afted 39 years. The funeral will occur from the residence at 2 o’clock this afternoon.

11 May 1885
Joseph Steinberger, 339 Bronson street, – twins – boy and girl – born Saturday morning, 9th inst.

11 May 1885
Another Old Resident Gone.
Abner Dunham, a member of the Old Residents’ Assocation, who had lived on his farm in Grand Rapids township since 1857, died on Saturday last. He was the father of Mrs. James Dolbee and Mrs. Asa P. Finch. The funeral, which was attended by a large number of Old Residents, occurred at the residence yesterday afternoon.

 

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